Food Anxiety in Globalising Vietnam (26/10/2019)

This open access book approaches the anxieties inherent in food consumption and production in Vietnam. The country’s rapid and recent economic integration into global agro-food systems and consumer markets spurred a new quality of food safety concerns, health issues and distrust in food distribution networks that have become increasingly obscured. This edited volume further puts the eating body centre stage by following how gendered body norms, food taboos, power structures and social differentiation shape people’s ambivalent relations with food. It uncovers Vietnam’s trajectories of agricultural modernisation against which consumers and producers manoeuvre amongst food self-sufficiency, security and abundance. Food Anxiety in Globalising Vietnam is explicitly about ‘dangerous’ food – regarding its materiality and meaning. It provides social science perspectives on anxieties related to food and surrounding discourses that travel between the local and the global, the individual and society and into the body. Therefore, the book’s lens of food anxiety matters for social theory and for understanding the embeddedness and discontinuities of food globalizations in Vietnam and beyond. Due to its rich empirical base, methodological approaches and thematic foci, it will appeal to scholars, practitioners and students alike.

Consuming Urban Culture in Contemporary Vietnam (26/10/2019)

Vietnam is currently undergoing a metamorphosis from a relatively closed society with a centrally planned economy, to a rapidly urbanising one with a global outlook. These changes have been the catalyst for an exciting ferment of activity in popular culture. This volume contains contributions from scholars engaged in the most up-to-date social research in Vietnam, as well as some of Vietnam's most popular cultural producers who are forging new ways of imagining the present whilst at the same time engaging actively in reinterpreting the past. The diverse ways that Vietnam is culturally and socially negotiating the future are examined as the book addresses issues of indigenisation of cultural influences, ambivalence surrounding change, and the consistent blurring of boundaries between informal, non-state cultural activities and formal institutional structures in the evolution of a civil society in Vietnam.

Moving Mountains: Ethnicity and Livelihoods in Highland China, Vietnam, and Laos (25/10/2019)

The mountainous borderlands of socialist China, Vietnam, and Laos are home to some seventy million minority people of diverse ethnicities. In Moving Mountains, anthropologists, geographers, and political economists with first-hand experience in the region explore these peoples’ survival strategies, as they respond to unprecedented economic and political change. Although highland peoples are typically represented as marginalized and powerless, this volume argues that ethnic minorities draw on culture and ethnicity to indigenize modernity and maintain their livelihoods. This unprecedented glimpse into a poorly understood region shows that development initiatives must be built on strong knowledge of local cultures in order to have lasting effect.

Environmental Governance in Vietnam: Institutional Reforms and Failures (25/10/2019)

This book deals with institutional reforms in response to a mounting environmental crisis in Vietnam. The author introduces the reader to the most important environmental problems that Vietnam is currently facing and shows how the emphasis on economic growth has come at the expense of the natural environment. Following an assessment of the still deteriorating environmental situation, the book develops a theoretical framework of institutional change within the political system seeking to overcome the traditionally static understanding of institutions. The empirical analysis devotes attention to the main aspects on Vietnam’s environmental governance including the government, society, businesses and international organizations. The book is based on four years of empirical research including interviews with government officials and representatives of international and national non-governmental organizations, observations of meetings, official documents, and numerous Vietnamese newspaper reports. This book is directed both at academics, students, as well as development practitioners and activists. It seeks to engage those working in the fields of environmental politics, governance, and institutional change in one-party states.

Human Ecology of Climate Change Hazards in Vietnam: Risks for Nature and Humans in Lowland and Upland Areas (25/10/2019)

This book analyzes climate change associated effects in the mountainous and coastal environments of Vietnam. The scope of the book allows international comparisons to be made between these two affected areas and other similarly affected locations under constant environmental pressure. Frequent and intense climate change hazards are described, along with a wider context of integrated interpretations, socioeconomic implications and policy responses. The book reports on original research combining methodologies from the natural sciences with approaches in human sciences, providing an interdisciplinary human ecological context to analyze similar situations worldwide.

Livelihood Pathways of Indigenous People in Vietnam’s Central Highlands: Exploring Land-Use Change (25/10/2019)

This study focuses on impacts of the environmental and socio-economic transformation on the indigenous people's livelihoods in Vietnam's Central Highlands recent decades since the country's reunification in 1975. The first empirical section sheds light on multiple external conditions (policy reforms, population trends, and market forces) exposed onto local people. The role of human and social capital is examined again in a specific livelihood of community-based tourism to testify the resilience level of local people when coping with constraints. The study concludes with an outlook on implications of development processed which still places agriculture at the primary position livelihood, and pays attention to human capital and social capital of indigenous groups in these highlands.

Water Resources and Food Security in the Vietnam Mekong Delta (25/10/2019)

The Mekong River has been a main source of conquest, conflict, and cooperation in the Southeast Asian region. Much has been written on the vital and critical importance of the Mekong River fresh water to the sustainable economic development of the Mekong Delta. This book selects the Mekong Delta as a case study of regional cooperation for water and food security for not only for Vietnam but also for the world in a new century of global economy. It focuses not only on the Mekong Delta as an integral part of the River but also on Can Tho City and its 12 provinces that produce over 50 percent of the country’s rice output and 60 percent of total fishery output. The book takes a micro approach to examine how each province is adapting to the twin threats of mainstream dams construction and climate change, reducing fresh water flows and increasing saline infusions on its present and future economy. Finally, it reviews the roles of international institutional arrangements, namely the Mekong Committee and the Mekong River Commission, in promoting regional cooperation among the riparian states for political and economic development of the Mekong Delta.

A Study of Personal and Cultural Values: American, Japanese, and Vietnamese (24/10/2019)

This study analyzes American, Vietnamese, and Japanese personal values, attempting to understand how it can be ethnographers find large differences in values between cultures, yet empirical surveys find relatively small differences in personal values between cultures. D’Andrade argues that people live in two distinct value worlds; the world of personal values and the world of institutionalized values. Assessing these value worlds, D’Andrade is able to explain the contrast between ethnography and survey data, while making vital commentary on American, Vietnamese, and Japanese culture. With insight and precision, this book contributes to the important debate that the Culture, Mind, and Society series has initiated.

Discursive Practices and Linguistic Meanings: The Vietnamese System of Person Reference (24/10/2019)

This is a theoretically oriented study of the pragmatics of Vietnamese person reference (kinship terms, personal pronouns, naming set and status terms). Drawing upon linguistic data from a radically different non-Western society and the seminal insights of Volosinov, Bakhtin, and Leach, it offers a critical analysis of the major theoretical premises of dominant approaches to denotation and connotation, to knowledge of language and to knowledge of the world. The study suggests that the pragmatic presuppositions of Vietnamese person-referring forms figure in the native definitions of linguistic meanings as prominently as any denotative features. It is argued that the significance of pragmatic implications should be analyzed in relation to the native speaker's conception of the world.

Of Vietnam: Identities in Dialogue (24/10/2019)

A rich space of criticism and document, Of Vietnam: Identities in Dialogue moves contemporary figurings of Vietnam out of the nostalgic enclaves of the past and the stagnant places of a mythological present into the rich potential of our historical epoch. This provocative book is the first to bring together works by photographers, established and unpublished writers, poets, and artists from Vietnam and its diasporas, and critical pieces by scholars of anthropology, art history, history, and literary and cultural studies. Focusing on issues of identity, displacement, language, sexuality, and class, their contributions challenge and encourage readers to experience the multiplicity of experiences that make up the fabric of identity.